L O O M   O F   T R A N S L A T I O N

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Reinterpreting age-old Indian techniques is an integral part of our story.

Achieving a harmony of narration with the looms, is a labour of love in which we take

immense joy. We explore a wide range of weaves from all over India, seeking new patrons

so that this tree of life can inspire our world forever...

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I K A T

In ancient times, Ikat was considered a symbol of status and prestige. Its colours are said to
denote the past, present & future, to the Vedas & Gods. The textile has been dated back
to as early as the 7th century and is also seen in murals of the Ajanta caves of Maharashtra.


B A N A R A S I

Banarasi weaving dates back to the 14th century, reaching its peak in the Mughal era.
It takes 5600 thread wires to weave the saree & depending on the intricacy of its
design, it can take from 15 days to a month and sometimes up to 6 months to complete. 


K A N J E E V A R A M

Made from ‘Mulberry Silk’, traditionally the sarees were adorned with scriptures from temples
of the Kanchipuram village or scenes from Ramayana and Mahabharata. Over decades,
Kanchipuram silk has been evolving in its design and pattern, though never losing
its charm and fine finish.


C H A N D E R I

 Chanderi is known to have its origin back in the Vedic Period, and is believed to have been
founded by Lord Krishna’s cousin, Shishupal. It was, and still is, a symbol of superlative
beauty & status. Intricately woven by hand, it has for times immemorial satisfied
the refined tastes of the royalty.


G o t a  p a t t i

Done exclusively by hand, the process involves appliqué work with small cut pieces of golden
or silver lace, forming intricate structured patterns. At Raisons, the designs are reinvented
using contemporary motifs like geometries, palanquin and check board.


l u C k n o w i

It is believed that ‘Chikankari’ had first been introduced by the queen Nur Jehan.
There are more than 35 types of stitches used in Chikankari, to achieve the unique texture
of  embroidery. All these are done completely by hand. Over the years, it has seen
 a paradigm shift in innovation and experimentation.


M A d h u b a n i

Originating in the district of Mithila, the village of goddess Sita, Madhubani artists are
masters at painting intricate patterns directly onto sarees. The skilful craftsmen use ingredients
like charcoal, rice, sandalwood, turmeric and indigo to produce natural dyes and add colour.


b l o c k  p r i n t

The art of Indian block print is a labor-intensive, painstaking process, that takes time,
team work & skill. Dating back to 3000 BC during the Indus Valley civilisation, over the centuries
there was a revitalisation of the art, and till today it is an art practiced by Indian artisans to create
beautiful vibrant designs on fabric.